Pedestal’s Perfection and the Kintsukuroi pieces

The gift of curiousity

If there is one gift I would grant a child, assuming love is already there, then it would be curiousity.  That courage to explore new places, meet new people with an openness that builds better relationships and turns strangers into friends.

It will change their thinking and their ability to learn.  It’s the gift that will encourage them to have ideas and invent things that change the world for the better, to travel to other places and cultures with respect, and even explore other galaxies.  It will keep rocking them back in wonder at creation and the world  around them, so that even when adults, they will stop and stare at a rose, whirl a dandelion head round to see what happens, or crunch through autumn leaves.

It’s what will allow them to wait to see the butterfly emerging from a cocoon, an egg hatching, what shape the bread that rested and was kneaded makes.  It means they can never be bored, for they can stimulate their imagination and get lost in different worlds of books and games.

It will give them the courage to take risks sometimes, to ask “what might happen if I try” – and find out that even if they fail, they can still be curious about the lessons they learned.  It encourages flexibility, and gives them the resilience to deal with uncertainty. It can turn everyday chores into adventures, and even give them the freedom to explore the big questions in life without fear (like who are we, what happens next, how can I bring peace, can I dare to be happier?)

That’s what I would give a child, if I had a magic wand. What would YOU give them?